Biochemistry undergraduate at SUNY Geneseo. In a band called A Secret Scenario. If I could, I would be Batman.

14th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Visualizing Math with 884 notes

visualizingmath:

allofthemath:

mathed-potatoes:

When people ask me how I can be a math major and still say I’m not good with numbers, I’m like ‘here, let me draw you a picture.’

All so true.

^For those that are considering majoring in math but are deterred by their lack of number skills, there’s definitely more to mathematics than simply numbers. (I’m not dissing stats or number theory or algebra though. Those are cool too!)

visualizingmath:

allofthemath:

mathed-potatoes:

When people ask me how I can be a math major and still say I’m not good with numbers, I’m like ‘here, let me draw you a picture.’

All so true.

^For those that are considering majoring in math but are deterred by their lack of number skills, there’s definitely more to mathematics than simply numbers. (I’m not dissing stats or number theory or algebra though. Those are cool too!)

Source: mathed-potatoes

7th September 2014

Quote reblogged from All hail the Science! with 16 notes

The universe is huge and old and rare things happen all the time. Including life.
— Lawrence Krauss (via running-geek)

2nd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from The crafty chemist with 3,904 notes

thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 

Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.

For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.

The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.

Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.

You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/

All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE

Source: thatscienceguy

30th August 2014

Post with 3 notes

The Secret Wonder Of RNA

The Secret Wonder Of RNA

Ribonucleic acid is the most misunderstood biomolecule by the general public. While the topic is presented to students in high school biology, the instruction is surface level. Unfortunately, this remains the case through much of college as well. It is a symptom of the way science is taught in America.

I first became aware of RNA in high school, and it was there that I was first underwhelmed.…

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Tagged: american educaionbiochemistrychemistrycollegedegreednaeducationhealthlablaboratorypublicresearchribonucleic acidrnaschoolsciencescience educationSTEMstudentstechnology

27th August 2014

Quote reblogged from La Clé de la Sirène with 734 notes

When you’re just starting to learn something new, the errors that you experience are helping you learn faster.

Source: fastcocreate.com

25th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Science Junkie with 33,882 notes

sagansense:

I always liked Carl’s assertion that celebrating scientific discovery and delighting in the pursuit of knowledge was no where comparable to communicating opinion, but rather, “informed worship.”

sagansense:

I always liked Carl’s assertion that celebrating scientific discovery and delighting in the pursuit of knowledge was no where comparable to communicating opinion, but rather, “informed worship.”

Source: foto119

25th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Scientists Are People Too with 530 notes

pbsparents:

Make your own thermometer with this neat science project!

See more Full-Time Kid with Mya here. 

Source: pbsparents

25th August 2014

Post reblogged from The Grand Staircase with 1,600 notes

Updated Science: Let’s Keep Science In Our Schools

fakescience:

Let's Keep Science In Our Schools

  • As the return to school approaches, please check that your kids have a teacher that understands entanglement.

Source: fakescience

25th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Laboratory Equipment with 1,742 notes

post-mitotic:


microscopic bone marrow transplant — hematopoietic stem cells (the immortal source of both red and white blood cells) poised in a syringe for transplant
colored SEM composite image
credit: Steve Gschmeissner

post-mitotic:

microscopic bone marrow transplant — hematopoietic stem cells (the immortal source of both red and white blood cells) poised in a syringe for transplant

colored SEM composite image

credit: Steve Gschmeissner

Source: post-mitotic

25th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Scientists Are People Too with 2,337 notes

planetaryfolklore:

beesandbombs: hexagons / stars

planetaryfolklore:

beesandbombs: hexagons / stars

Source: beesandbombs