Biochemistry undergraduate at SUNY Geneseo. In a band called A Secret Scenario. If I could, I would be Batman.

24th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from the grand staircase with 2,149 notes

Beauty.

Source: likeaphysicist

24th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from When the world collapses with 1,615 notes

Source: downeying

24th July 2014

Photo reblogged from the grand staircase with 950 notes

xysciences:

Real life visualization of a magnetic field.
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

xysciences:

Real life visualization of a magnetic field.

[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

Source: xysciences

24th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Scientists Are People Too with 574 notes

Source: benmarriott

24th July 2014

Chat reblogged from La Clé de la Sirène with 758 notes

  • NASA: provides troves of data about the moon that couldn't be made up
  • NASA: provides images of it used by technologies that were just being made at the time
  • NASA: provided thousands of jobs to citizens in the quest to learn about the moon
  • NASA: uses the very real data acquired from its moon missions to further understand moon formations and satellites like it
  • NASA: dealt with grueling tests, trials and tribulations to get people on the moon
  • person:
  • some conspiracy site you got linked off a youtube vid about aliens: what if he nasa not went not moon?
  • person: you have a point, this could have all been staged

Source: afro-dominicano

18th July 2014

Question reblogged from Scientists Are People Too with 28,675 notes

Anonymous said: Hey Shychemist. I've been following your blog for awhile and I want to bring up something that seems dated but nonetheless holds to be accurate today. I feel like the girls who consider themselves to be on the science side of tumblr to be horribly mistaken. It's statistically proven that women applicants struggle to get into stem doctorate programs, and rightfully so, they don't belong there. examples- atomic-o-licious, brainsx , adventuresinchemistry, i can't fit anymore but you get it

callstheadventurescience:

ecumenicalseeker:

hannahoort:

astropheminism:

nonlinearfluctuations:

chemistry-of-chaos:

dinostuck:

scientistsarepeopletoo:

adventuresinchemistry:

smilesandvials:

shychemist:

It doesn’t seem dated, your attitude is dated. This is the 21st century.

Women deserve to be in STEM programs just as much as men. I’d wager they deserve to succeed in the Sciences even more than men because of the sexism and misogyny they experience.

They struggle to get in because they’re the minority, and a lot of people who could admit them are sexist (regardless of gender) because of the society they grew up in. Its not through any intellectual weakness. These women are amazing and just as smart as the men in their fields.

You have no right to say these things to these amazing women, many of whom I consider to be friends.

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Wow. That seems like really fucking wrong. And offensive.
And I would love to take some more time out of my day to be pissed about it.
But…
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It seems that I have a lot of fucking science to do. 
So, uh, screw that.
If anybody needs me, me and my lady bits will be getting some fucking science done.

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I’m oddly excited to have been name checked by this shitty anon. Because it means that the very fact that I got into an Ivy League, top 15 science PhD program (where I fucking belong) is a giant fuck you to shitty anon. Also, shitty anons make Lewis sad. Because Lewis is a feminists science hippo.

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imageBest way for me to deal with shitty nonnies who think women can’t do science? DO MORE SCIENCE!!!! MWAHAHAHA

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Crap, I’m a woman biologist. I’d go get another career but I have a groundbreaking thesis on rapid evolution of reproductive isolation between seed beetle populations to finish. 

I’m not a well-known tumblr scientist…but I am a scientist all the same. And while I could probably obtain a more gender-appropriate occupation… I’m pretty content with the fact I’m an atmospheric chemist Additionally, I am also one of the few women who have managed to be selected to intern at NASA’s airborne research program. 

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Do I not deserve a place in the STEM fields, anon? 

Hey ladies! Mind if some physicists join in?

At the CERN visiting the CMS part of the LHC where were were working for 8 months on both computational and experimental work:

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Presenting our research at a conference on Physics of Living Systems:
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And visiting the Wind Tunnel experiment after presenting our research at Max Planck Institute at a Advances in Cardiac Dynamics Workshop

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Oh, me? What do I do? I try to understand why superbursts happen in neutron stars! This is important because: they shouldn’t happen but they do. And the implications could be astoundingly helpful for things like, oh I don’t know, nuclear fusion.

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Oh, just me, at a conference after presenting this:

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"don’t belong there"?! excuse you! 
Im not a science tumblr but i am a girl and a geologist so i kinda prove you wrong…?

In the Sorbas Basin finding fossilised bird trackways and fossilised rain drops
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Using HCl to dissolve solnhofen plattenkalk (limestones) to make plastic copies of exceptional fossils  

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On board the HMS Discovery, a state of the art scientific ship which anchors at the NOC (national oceanography centre Southampton)

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Doing some geological mapping and fieldwork in Ingleton Yorkshire

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So yeh anon, you’re wrong and very very very outdated in your opinions 

oh wow this anon thinks that women don’t belong in STEM—

better throw my archaeology B.A. in the trash, burn my thesis and stop teaching biology, chemistry and physics to the 8-12th grades.

OH WAIT
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I’ve got image 

SCIENCE TO DO

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NO TIME FOR SEXIST MAN CHILD ANONS

oh I guess I should burn the cheque I got for guest lecturing in grad school too—

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Yeah honestly anon, screw off. I’m a recent graduate with a BS in Biology and I’m tired of the same old sexist attitudes that are recycled by you and your ignorant ilk.
But whatever, I’m a bit busy, you know, in lab…
imageimage

Or in the field…imageidk, so many lady bits headed out into the wilderness, whatever are we going to do?

…doing some real science in the goddamn Atlantic Rain Forest.
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Or you know, playing with working on conservation efforts for BABY SEA TURTLES.
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And you know what anon? The only time being a woman in science has ever impacted me is when whiny, dated miscreants like you try to get in my way.

Honestly, the women I work with at school are much better at doing science than the men. They care more, are more organized, and work harder. I prefer working with women in science over men. Welcome to the new generation of science.

Tagged: womenfeminismwomen in sciencestemwomen in stemcollegesciencetechnologygirls

Source: shychemist

17th July 2014

Photo

Finally getting somewhere on this summer project. Now to make this accurate…

Finally getting somewhere on this summer project. Now to make this accurate…

Tagged: Network modelscienceSciencecomputer modelcomputationbiochemistryregulationglycogenlifemetabolism

16th July 2014

Photo reblogged from LUCY with 376 notes

lucythemovie:

She can unlock secrets that go beyond our universe. On 7/25, Scarlett Johansson is Lucy. #LucyMovie

Apparently freshman level calculus is a secret beyond the universe… I too can access 100% of my brain and do calculus. Where’s my movie?

lucythemovie:

She can unlock secrets that go beyond our universe. On 7/25, Scarlett Johansson is Lucy. #LucyMovie

Apparently freshman level calculus is a secret beyond the universe… I too can access 100% of my brain and do calculus. Where’s my movie?

Tagged: Lucybrainmythhollywood

14th July 2014

Photo reblogged from La Clé de la Sirène with 800 notes

mermaidskey:

sciencesoup:

Hershey and Chase Experiment
Biologists have known that DNA exists since 1869, but until the 1950s, they didn’t know it carried the genetic information of the cell—they thought proteins held that honour, since they seemed to be so much more complex. An early, incorrect experiment proposed that the nucleotides in DNA are arranged in a repeating sequence instead of unique codes, which supported the idea that they were simpler molecules.
But in 1953, Alfred Hershey and Martha Chase showed for sure that the genetic material was not, in fact, proteins. Like many fundamental experiments in the field of biology, theirs was beautifully simple.
The key component was a virus called bacteriophage. As its name suggests, it infects bacteria, taking over their replication processes in order to make copies of itself—usually, so many replicates are made that eventually the host bacteria bursts, spreading the virus to other cells. A bacteriophage achieves this by attaching to the bacteria’s surface and injecting genetic material down into the core to start the replication process. Hershey and Chase worked with T2 bacteriophage and E. coli bacteria.
Since bacteriophages are simply composed of a protein “shell” that encloses their DNA or RNA genome, they were perfect for the experiment—all Hershey and Chase had to do was see whether protein or DNA was injected into the bacteria.
However, they had to uniquely label the two components so they could tell which was where. For this, they used their knowledge of the structure of protein and DNA: sulphur is contained in proteins but not DNA, and phosphorous is contained in DNA but not protein. So Hershey and Chase began to conduct two experiments side by side: one where they grew protein in radioactive sulphur-35 and used normal DNA, and one where they used normal protein and grew DNA in radioactive phosphorous-32.
Here’s how the rest went down:
Introduce bacteria to the two different bacteriophages.
The bacteriophages get to work. The shells remain on the outside of the bacteria, while its genetic material is injected into the bacteria.
Hershey and Chase centrifuged the mixtures to separate the bits out by density—a centrifuge is essentially a ultra-fast, ultra-cool blender. The lighter shells are shaken away from the denser bacteria cores, which still contain the genetic material.
Use a Geiger counter to check which part is radioactive, the shell or the material in the bacteria.
And as you might have guessed, here’s what they found:
In the experiment where protein was radioactive, the shells were found to be radioactive while the infected bacteria were not.
In the experiment where DNA was radioactive, the infected bacteria were found to be radioactive while the shells were not.
Therefore, Hershey and Chase concluded that DNA was injected into the bacteria and used to make copies of the phage, so DNA must be the genetic material.
Note for those interested: Hershey received a Nobel Prize for his efforts, but Chase did not, possibly because she was a lab technician (or, of course, a woman).
Further resources: McGraw Hill video and Biography of Martha Chase


An extremely important experiment to the history of molecular biology- and of course, it is almost never mentioned that Chase was a woman.

mermaidskey:

sciencesoup:

Hershey and Chase Experiment

Biologists have known that DNA exists since 1869, but until the 1950s, they didn’t know it carried the genetic information of the cell—they thought proteins held that honour, since they seemed to be so much more complex. An early, incorrect experiment proposed that the nucleotides in DNA are arranged in a repeating sequence instead of unique codes, which supported the idea that they were simpler molecules.

But in 1953, Alfred Hershey and Martha Chase showed for sure that the genetic material was not, in fact, proteins. Like many fundamental experiments in the field of biology, theirs was beautifully simple.

The key component was a virus called bacteriophage. As its name suggests, it infects bacteria, taking over their replication processes in order to make copies of itself—usually, so many replicates are made that eventually the host bacteria bursts, spreading the virus to other cells. A bacteriophage achieves this by attaching to the bacteria’s surface and injecting genetic material down into the core to start the replication process. Hershey and Chase worked with T2 bacteriophage and E. coli bacteria.

Since bacteriophages are simply composed of a protein “shell” that encloses their DNA or RNA genome, they were perfect for the experiment—all Hershey and Chase had to do was see whether protein or DNA was injected into the bacteria.

However, they had to uniquely label the two components so they could tell which was where. For this, they used their knowledge of the structure of protein and DNA: sulphur is contained in proteins but not DNA, and phosphorous is contained in DNA but not protein. So Hershey and Chase began to conduct two experiments side by side: one where they grew protein in radioactive sulphur-35 and used normal DNA, and one where they used normal protein and grew DNA in radioactive phosphorous-32.

Here’s how the rest went down:

  1. Introduce bacteria to the two different bacteriophages.
  2. The bacteriophages get to work. The shells remain on the outside of the bacteria, while its genetic material is injected into the bacteria.
  3. Hershey and Chase centrifuged the mixtures to separate the bits out by density—a centrifuge is essentially a ultra-fast, ultra-cool blender. The lighter shells are shaken away from the denser bacteria cores, which still contain the genetic material.
  4. Use a Geiger counter to check which part is radioactive, the shell or the material in the bacteria.

And as you might have guessed, here’s what they found:

  • In the experiment where protein was radioactive, the shells were found to be radioactive while the infected bacteria were not.
  • In the experiment where DNA was radioactive, the infected bacteria were found to be radioactive while the shells were not.

Therefore, Hershey and Chase concluded that DNA was injected into the bacteria and used to make copies of the phage, so DNA must be the genetic material.

Note for those interested: Hershey received a Nobel Prize for his efforts, but Chase did not, possibly because she was a lab technician (or, of course, a woman).

Further resources: McGraw Hill video and Biography of Martha Chase

An extremely important experiment to the history of molecular biology- and of course, it is almost never mentioned that Chase was a woman.

Source: sciencesoup

6th July 2014

Post reblogged from The crafty chemist with 655 notes

thecraftychemist:

cyclopentadiene:

Thomas Klapötke’s lab in Germany does some terrifying nitrogen chemistry…

Like
image

just
image

look
image

at
image

these
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WHERE ARE THE HYDROGENS

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TOO MANY NITRO GROUPS
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WHY WOULD YOU MAKE THESE
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?????????
image

 

EDIT: via cyclopentadiene

From the paper on C2N14 (that one with three -N3 groups on the substituted tetrazole):

image

Translation: “Taking an IR of this thing was enough to make it blow up.”

So scary and so awesome.

Source: cyclopentadiene