Biochemistry undergraduate at SUNY Geneseo. In a band called A Secret Scenario. If I could, I would be Batman.

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from It's Okay To Be Smart with 16,679 notes

jtotheizzoe:

boop.
This man.

jtotheizzoe:

boop.

This man.

14th April 2014

Video reblogged from SkepTV with 35 notes

skeptv:

Adam Savage’s SXSW 2014 Keynote: Art and Science

Adam Savage talks about the importance of the relationship between art and science for his keynote at this year’s SXSW Interactive Conference. What can scientists learn from artists (and vice versa)? How can technologists be better storytellers? Adam discusses these topics and more and then sits down for a Q&A with Tested.com

Duration: 54:00

via Tested.


14th April 2014

Video reblogged from It's Okay To Be Smart with 2,002 notes

jtotheizzoe:

skunkbear:

Can you control your metabolism with your mind?

Turns out … yes.

Watch the science desk’s new video: a super fun collaboration between Alix Spiegel and Bianca Giaever.

Food as placebo! Does labeling something “low fat” or “healthy” trick our brains in the wrong direction? Feed your mind with this great vid from NPR Science.

Previously: Learn more about the weirdness of placebos, from medicine color to pill size, with this video.

Interesting, but slightly annoying that the “fat hypothesis” is used here. Turns out there’s not even a strong correlation to eating fat and getting fat, and I don’t have to tell you scientists that a correlation is very weak on its own.

Tagged: nutritionplacebofoodfatfat freescience

Source: skunkbear

14th April 2014

Photo with 2 notes

For anyone interested, here’s the model my group presented at G.R.E.A.T. day at SUNY Geneseo for the Modeling Biological Systems class. I uploaded a picture of me giving my part of the presentation last week and I figured some of you might like to see the model. Message me with any questions you’d like answered or if you’d like to see the R code for the model.

For anyone interested, here’s the model my group presented at G.R.E.A.T. day at SUNY Geneseo for the Modeling Biological Systems class. I uploaded a picture of me giving my part of the presentation last week and I figured some of you might like to see the model. Message me with any questions you’d like answered or if you’d like to see the R code for the model.

Tagged: sciencebiologyprionspresentationsschoolSUNYsuny geneseogeneseobiochemistrymathmathematicsmodelingdifferential equationsmodelmathematicl modelcomputer sciencer studioprogrammingeducation

14th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Visualizing Math with 7,678 notes

try-and-touch-my-asymptote:

scienceisbeauty:

One of the answers to the topic: Visually stunning math concepts which are easy to explain at Mathematics Stack Exchange.

I think if you look at this animation and think about it long enough, you’ll understand:
Why circles and right-angle triangles and angles are all related
Why sine is opposite over hypotenuse and so on
Why cosine is simply sine but offset by pi/2 radians



This is also why radians are more superior than degrees.

try-and-touch-my-asymptote:

scienceisbeauty:

One of the answers to the topic: Visually stunning math concepts which are easy to explain at Mathematics Stack Exchange.

I think if you look at this animation and think about it long enough, you’ll understand:

  • Why circles and right-angle triangles and angles are all related
  • Why sine is opposite over hypotenuse and so on
  • Why cosine is simply sine but offset by pi/2 radians

This is also why radians are more superior than degrees.

Source: scienceisbeauty

14th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Molecular Life Sciences with 11,426 notes

tedx:

At TEDxYouth@Manchester, genetics researcher Dan Davis introduces the audience to compatibility genes — key players in our immune system’s functioning, and the reason why it’s so difficult to transplant organs from person to person: one’s compatibility genes must match another’s for a transplant to take.

To learn more about these fascinating genes, watch the whole talk here»

(Images from Davis’s talk, Drew Berry’s animations, and the TED-Ed lessons A needle in countless haystacks: Finding habitable worlds - Ariel Anbar and How we conquered the deadly smallpox virus - Simona Zompi)

Source: tedx

13th April 2014

Quote reblogged from Eee! Tess Ate Chai Tea! with 7 notes

I know, I know. The term “bitchslap” is problematic. But it’s only problematic if you’re a sexist jerk that hears the word “bitch” and automatically thinks that it means “woman.” Now that’s problematic! Stop being sexist in your interpretations of the words I’m using! By “bitch,” I obviously meant a non-gender specific somebody that sucks at Call of Duty.

I know, I know. Redefining words that have never been used to demean or oppress the person redefining the word is problematic! You know what else is problematic? A world where everybody rushes to be offended and upset just to prove that they’re smarter and better than the person they’ve just been offended by!

I know, I know. Policing other people’s reactions to words and expecting them to feel the same way I do is problematic! But it’s only problematic if you know what the meaning of the word “problematic” is which I don’t think I do because I keep saying things I’m writing are problematic but I don’t seem to care! Ignorance is its own reward!
— Eee! Tess Ate Chai Tea, Commentary on Earth 2 #21 (via tessatechaitea)

13th April 2014

Photo reblogged from It's Okay To Be Smart with 6,984 notes

jtotheizzoe:

compoundchem:

Version 1 of ‘A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science’. Thanks for everyone’s suggestions earlier in the week, attempted to include as many of them as possible!
Download link here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ap

Approach the world with an open mind, but not so open that your brains fall out.
Here’s a list of tips on how to weigh good science from bad. Combine that with my video on “How to Read Science News" and you’ll be in pretty good shape and shall never be led astray: 


So important.

jtotheizzoe:

compoundchem:

Version 1 of ‘A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science’. Thanks for everyone’s suggestions earlier in the week, attempted to include as many of them as possible!

Download link here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ap

Approach the world with an open mind, but not so open that your brains fall out.

Here’s a list of tips on how to weigh good science from bad. Combine that with my video on “How to Read Science News" and you’ll be in pretty good shape and shall never be led astray: 

So important.

Tagged: scienceliteracyeducationnewshealthinfographic

Source: compoundchem

12th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from 23 Pairs of Chromosomes with 245 notes

swirish:

Images of the week:

  1. Breast cancer cell
  2. Gonorrhoea bacteria 
  3. E.coli biofilm
  4. Neuron
  5. Mitochondria
  6. Chromosomes

Source: swirish

12th April 2014

Post with 2 notes

Learn statistics.

Do it. You owe it to yourself and to society. It’s nice to know when one is being lied to.

Tagged: statisticsscienceknowledgesmartthinking